Safety is our Priority

At any summer camp, creepy critters and illnesses may arise. To help keep campers safe and prevent spreading, we:

  1. Ask that parents notify their Camp Director about lice or other illnesses that others might have been exposed to while their child was at camp
  2. Will call parents or guardians and send an email to enrolled families alerting them to their child’s potential exposure

Please take a look at our specific policies related to common scenarios that may occur at camp:

Head Lice

Head lice are parasitic insects that are spread by contact with an infested person or items such as rugs, couches, car seats or by the exchange of hats, clothing, headphones, or personal items. Please note that we take every precaution to ensure kids do not share any of the aforementioned items at camp and will be on the look out for kids itching their scalps. Please note that head lice are more likely to be spread at home than in the camp setting.

Should we learn of lice from a family or discover lice at camp, we will follow the following precautionary measures:

  • Contact the parent or guardian and ask that they pick up their child/children at camp
  • Notify all families attending camp that week so they can be on the look out for these little critters at home
  • Request a 24 hour waiting period after discovery & treatment before returning your child to camp as it might take 8-12 hours for lice to die post treatment
CDC Info on Head Lice

Chicken Pox

Chicken pox appears as a very itchy rash that spreads from the torso to the neck, face and limbs. The illness is spread by droplets from a sneeze or cough, or by contact with clothing. Although clothing is obviously not shared at camp, it is almost impossible to prevent the spreading of any airborne germs and unfortunately chicken pox is highly contagious. If you think your child may have chicken pox, please consult your physician immediately.

As a precautionary measure should we learn about a camper who has attended camp and has chicken pox,  we will let you know as soon as possible so you can be on the lookout for any symptoms. The camper with chicken pox will obviously not be returning to camp until they are well.

CDC Info on Chicken Pox

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a common viral illness that usually starts with a fever, reduced appetite, sore throat, and a feeling of being unwell. One or two days after the fever starts, painful sores can develop in the mouth. A skin rash with red spots may also develop over one or two days on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.

As a precautionary measure, should we become aware of a child with hoof and mouth disease, we will notify all families who are attending camp that week as soon as possible so you can be on the lookout for symptoms. The campers with this illness will obviously not be returning to camp until they are well.

The illness is spread by coughing or sneezing. As it is almost impossible to prevent the spreading of any airborne germs, Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease unfortunately is highly contagious. If you think your child may have Hand, Foot & Mouth disease, please consult your physician.

CDC Info on Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease

Pink Eye

Pink eye, or conjunctivitis, is one of the most common and treatable eye conditions. It is an inflammation of the thin, clear tissue that lines the inside of the eyelid and the white part of the eyeball. This inflammation makes blood vessels more visible and gives the eye a pink or reddish color.

Should we receive notice that one of our campers has Pink Eye, we will notify all families who are attending camp that week so they can be on the lookout for any symptoms. The camper with this illness will not be returning to camp until they are well.

Pink eye can be very contagious and spread easily and quickly from person to person. You can reduce the risk of getting or spreading pink eye by washing hands, avoiding touch the eye area or sharing items likes eyeglasses. If you think your child may have Pink Eye, please consult your physician.

CDC Info on Pink Eye

Scabies

Scabies is an infestation of the skin by the human itch mite. The most common signs and symptoms of scabies are intense itching (especially at night) and a pimple-like, itchy rash. Please note that scabies usually is spread by direct, prolonged, skin-to-skin contact with a person who already has it and a quick handshake or hug usually will not spread scabies. If you think your child may have scabies, please consult your physician.

Should we receive a report of “scabies” from someone at camp, we will let you know as soon as possible so you can be on the lookout for any symptoms.

CDC Info on Scabies